FULL COURSE OVERVIEW

September 9th - November 11th, 2019

     

Snapshots from the 2019 Summer Intensive

Join us this fall and delve into the heart of Waldorf education!  Challenge awaits as you experience and work with new instructional strategies while learning how to improve your ability to observe children.  Great Lakes Waldorf Institute’s 2019 fall online course and weekend retreat will build awareness for the different ways one can approach the teaching of today’s children.

    Continuing Education 

Whether veteran teacher or life-long learner, GLWI offers the following opportunities to grow and develop!

  1. Participate in the Fall Weekend Retreat (October 24-27) – For further information or to register, CLICK HERE.
  2. Audit the Fall Course (EDU 742: Instructional Strategies), including the weekend retreat as a special student through Mount Mary University.

   Waldorf Teacher Training

Ready to begin the journey towards your Waldorf Teaching Certificate with or without or a Master’s of Arts degree in Education from Mount Mary University?  Great Lakes Waldorf Institute and our partner, Mount Mary University have the experience and expertise to meet your educational goals.

CLICK HERE for more information!

Courses

Great Lakes Waldorf Institute’s programming is thoughtfully crafted to grow relationships while supporting spiritual development and preparing teachers-in-training for the challenge of student, parent and collegial work in schools dedicated to Waldorf education.  GLWI’s blended programming seamlessly weaves distance learning with in-person retreats, providing the unique opportunity to work while training.  Each course or retreat includes a mix of content-based/pedagogical work, inner- and human development, movement, artistic experiences and discussions.

All courses can be audited for professional development or continuing education. For further information, please contact Sandra at (414) 299-3820 or admin@greatlakeswaldorf.org.

 

 

EDU 742 Instructional Strategies – Early Childhood: Meeting the Developmental Needs of the Young Child

The purpose of this course is for students to gain knowledge of the Waldorf geography curriculum and how it can be integrated into early childhood and grades curricula as well as other subject areas. From the point of view of place and its importance to healthy social, emotional and conceptual growth, one might say the study of geography is the heart of the Waldorf curriculum.  In Teaching Geography, Roy Wilkinson states: “Of all subjects, geography perhaps lends itself best to awakening a feeling of social responsibility.  By social responsibility, we mean the awareness of, and consideration for, other people and other modes of life.”  Students will gain knowledge of a variety of instructional strategies and work with the Waldorf geography teaching curriculum and pedagogy appropriate to the developmental age of children from kindergarten through grade 8.

In addition, through the fall retreat (November 14-17) Early Childhood students will:

  1. Deepen their comprehension of Steiner’s picture of the incarnating child and continue to identify some of the obstacles that block this process, including Reflex Maturation, Motor Proficiency and development profiles of the young child, Sensory Integration and classic signs of sensory integration dysfunction, Autism Spectrum Disorder.
  2. Strengthen their understanding of how the Waldorf Kindergarten program meets the developmental needs of the young child.
  3. Learn how to observe the child, including the signs of First Grade readiness and student evaluation.
  4. Deepen their Circle Time movement work, especially with the hand gesture games of Wilma Ellersiek and “zoo” exercises.

Required Texts:

  • Culturally responsive teaching & the brain: Promoting authentic engagement & rigor among culturally & linguistically diverse students. Hammond, Z. (2015), Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin
  • The First Seven Years – Physiology of Childhood by Edmond Schoorel
  • Solving the Riddle of the Child: the Art of the Child Study by Christof Wiechert

EDU 742 INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES – GRADES: TEACHING GEOGRAPHY IN THE WALDORF SCHOOL

The purpose of this course is for students to gain knowledge of the Waldorf geography curriculum and how it can be integrated into early childhood and grades curricula as well as other subject areas. From the point of view of place and its importance to healthy social, emotional and conceptual growth, one might say the study of geography is the heart of the Waldorf curriculum.  In Teaching Geography, Roy Wilkinson states: “Of all subjects, geography perhaps lends itself best to awakening a feeling of social responsibility.  By social responsibility, we mean the awareness of, and consideration for, other people and other modes of life.”  Students will gain knowledge of a variety of instructional strategies and work with the Waldorf geography teaching curriculum and pedagogy appropriate to the developmental age of children from kindergarten through grade 8.

In addition, through their Fall Retreat (October 24-27), Grades students will:

  • Gain an understanding of a variety of instructional strategies designed to meet the learning styles of a diverse classroom.
  • Gain an understanding of the value of the geography curriculum as an integrating thread with other subjects in the Waldorf curriculum.
  • Gain an understanding of the way personal, social, and physical geography are presented in an Early Childhood program.
  • Gain an understanding of the history of geography and human consciousness and its relation to developmental stages of childhood.
  • Practice spatial dynamic exercises and gain an understanding into their application in the grade school.
  • Learn planning and presentation of strategies by preparing and presenting a lesson, and by observing presentations by other participants.
  • Learn a number of approaches to map making and gain an understanding of a variety of map projection techniques.
  • Learn about brain research in relation to child development and its implications for grades and early childhood teaching.

Required Texts:

  • Culturally responsive teaching & the brain: Promoting authentic engagement & rigor among culturally & linguistically diverse students. Hammond, Z. (2015), Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin
  • Solving the Riddle of the Child: the Art of the Child Study by Christof Wiechert

In addition, all grades students should have a copy of:

  • Educational Tasks and Content of the Steiner Waldorf Curriculum by Rawson and Richter

Lodging

Less Expensive Lodging Options for the Fall

Accommodations at the Wisconsin State Fair Grounds

  • Tommy G. Thompson Youth Center

Private, dormitory style housing is available in the Tommy G. Thompson Youth Center.  Private rooms can house up to six people.

  • Wisconsin State Fair RV Park

The ONLY RV Park in Metro Milwaukee and it is open year-round!

Conveniently located at the Wisconsin State Fair Park, adjacent to Interstate 94, the Tommy G. Thompson Youth Center and the RV Park are just minutes to Mount Mary University.  Travel time to either Prairie Hill or Tamarack Waldorf Schools will take between 20-30 minutes depending on traffic.  To explore these options, click here.

 

Local Park with Campsites

Naga-Waukee, a Waukesha County Park, offers reasonable and convenient camping nestled between 2 lakes.  The diverse topographical features were created during the glacial age, which enhances the beauty of the site.  Camp sites are limited to 2 camping units maximum. No hookup for electric or water. Park Hours: Sunrise to 10pm (YearRound) Daily Entrance Fee: $5.  Located 5 minutes from Prairie Hill Waldorf School, it is an easy commute on I-94 to Mount Mary University or Tamarack Waldorf School.  To explore this option, click here.

 

Housing Near Prairie Hill Waldorf School

Contact Dawn Van-kley Imes at (262) 825-7879  |  imesfam@gmail.com